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Meditate and call me in the morning: Study looks at doctors' referrals for mind-body therapies

meditating on bench.jpg

Are physicians becoming more open to complementary and alternative therapies, including meditation and yoga? Perhaps so, as reported by the Daily Dose's Deborah Kotz:

A study published yesterday in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that some three percent of Americans, who responded to a government health survey, were practicing some sort of mind-body therapy as a result of a physician referral.

That's still far less than the more than 15 percent of respondents surveyed who said they initiated these therapies on their own. But, hey, it's a start, considering how resistant doctors have been to adopting alternative remedies that veer away from mainstream medicine.

"To me this indicates that the use of mind-body therapies in the conventional medical setting is becoming more widely accepted -- absolutely," says study author Dr. Aditi Nerurkar, a fellow in integrative medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Nerurkar's research can be found here.

Previously: Americans' use of complementary medicine on the rise
Photo by Sergiu Alistar

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