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Bye, bye bumpers: APA says empty cribs are safest for infants

Bye, bye bumpers: APA says empty cribs are safest for infants

I’ve written before about a quandry facing many new parents: Should they put a bumper in their baby’s crib or not? Now comes from the definitive answer from American Academy of Pediatrics: No. In case you haven’t heard the news this morning, the organization is now saying bumpers should never be used. CNN.com reports:

This recommendation, issued as part of an updated and expanded set of guidelines on safe sleep and SIDS prevention for babies, is the first time the AAP has officially come out against the use of crib bumpers. According to the AAP, there is no evidence that crib bumpers protect against injury, but they do carry a potential risk of suffocation, strangulation, or entrapment because infants lack the motor skills or strength to turn their heads should they roll into something that obstructs their breathing.

Previously: Pediatric experts: Skip the bumper in Baby’s crib

One Response to “ Bye, bye bumpers: APA says empty cribs are safest for infants ”

  1. Dawn Says:

    I recall this topic being debated when my children were infants and they are now in their mid 20′s. There were a number of news items but I recall one in particular. It was not a new born infant but a toddler that attempted to climb out of his crib and was strangled by the tie ribbons. On the back of this news I immediately removed the bumpers from my baby’s crib.

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