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Med school: Up close and personal

Earlier in the week I wrote about Med School 101, an annual event during which local high-schoolers come to Stanford to play med student for the day. Writer Mandy Erickson was there, and she had this to say today:

Most of the participants are thinking of careers in medicine or related fields, like [Francisco] Morales, a junior at Gunn High School in Palo Alto. “Ever since I was little, I was interested in chemistry and things like that, so I figured I would come and see,” he said. “It’ll help me make a decision about where to go to college, what I’d like to study.”

Clarence Braddock, MD, MPH, associate dean for medical education, welcomed [the students] to the event by describing his own path to medicine. “I’m a tiny bit embarrassed to say I was inspired by TV shows,” he admitted, but added that volunteering as a high school student at a hospital, where he helped patients into wheelchairs and brought them sodas, gave him a sense of the reward of working with people who are vulnerable.

Erickson goes on to describe some of the sessions offered to the students, including one involving "the coolest toy of the day:" a virtual anatomy table that resembles a 6-foot-long iPad.

Previously: A quick primer on getting into medical school, Teens interested in medicine encouraged to “think beyond the obvious” and High-school students get a taste of med school
Photo by Norbert von der Groeben

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