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Parenting, Pediatrics

Research suggests bacteria from dogs may protect against asthma

Research suggests bacteria from dogs may protect against asthma

Imagine a room filled with babies and puppies. That scene is undoubtably adorable. But is it also therapeutic?

New research suggests that infants who are exposed daily to dogs may be less likely to develop childhood asthma. A blog entry on The Atlantic offers more detail:

The researchers think that exposure to certain microbes in early infancy changes the early composition of an infant’s intestinal flora and this sets the tone for how the developing immune system will respond later in childhood.

The study used a mouse model. Researchers found that the mice that were exposed to the bacteria did not show symptoms of respiratory syncytial virus.

Previously: A girl’s best friend: How owning a dog helps moms-to-be stay physically active, Prenatal exposure to pets may lower early allergy risks and Eat a germ, fight an allergy
Photo by Sébastian GARNIER

One Response to “ Research suggests bacteria from dogs may protect against asthma ”

  1. Jan Paula@ The Parent Help Center Says:

    I have asthma and my children got it too. I have a 10-month old baby who is under Montelukast regimen because of her asthma. Our neighbor gave us a Labrador puppy, and it is so cute that my kids constantly cuddle it. I just realized that the doctor just warned me about having furry friends in the house, but the dog has been with us for a month now, and me and my kids never had an asthma attack. And I have never seen my children this happy before. So I guess the research is an actual breakthrough.

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