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Research suggests bacteria from dogs may protect against asthma

Imagine a room filled with babies and puppies. That scene is undoubtably adorable. But is it also therapeutic?

New research suggests that infants who are exposed daily to dogs may be less likely to develop childhood asthma. A blog entry on The Atlantic offers more detail:

The researchers think that exposure to certain microbes in early infancy changes the early composition of an infant's intestinal flora and this sets the tone for how the developing immune system will respond later in childhood.

The study used a mouse model. Researchers found that the mice that were exposed to the bacteria did not show symptoms of respiratory syncytial virus.

Previously: A girl's best friend: How owning a dog helps moms-to-be stay physically active, Prenatal exposure to pets may lower early allergy risks and Eat a germ, fight an allergy
Photo by Sébastian GARNIER

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