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Ask Stanford Med: Urology chair taking questions on prostate cancer and the latest research

Ask Stanford Med: Urology chair taking questions on prostate cancer and the latest research

There has been much discussion over the years about the pros and cons of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. And this past May, a U.S. government task force sparked controversy with its recommendation that doctors not routinely screen healthy men for prostate cancer using the test.

To continue the conversation on prostate cancer and screening, and in recognition of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, we’ve asked Eila Skinner, MD, chair of the urology department at Stanford, to respond to your questions on the disease and the latest research advancements in diagnosis and treatment.

The second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States, prostate cancer occurs mainly in older men. Nearly two thirds are diagnosed in men aged 65 or older and one in six men in America will be diagnosed with the disease during his lifetime, according to statistics from the American Cancer Society.

One of the most highly respected urologic surgeons in the nation, Skinner served as the vice chair of the urology department at the University of Southern California prior to being named chair here in February. Her primary research interests are in the area of cancer prevention, bladder cancer and urinary tract reconstruction. As medical director of the “Real Men Cook” Foundation since 2003, she has coordinated education and screening for prostate cancer for more than 1,000 Los Angeles-area African-American and Latino men annually.

Questions can be submitted to Skinner by either sending a tweet that includes the hashtag #AskSUMed or posting your question in the comments section below. We’ll collect questions until Tuesday (Sept. 11) at 5 pm.

When submitting questions, please abide by the following ground rules:

  • Stay on topic
  • Be respectful to the person answering your questions
  • Be respectful to one another in submitting questions
  • Do not monopolize the conversation or post the same question repeatedly
  • Kindly ignore disrespectful or off topic comments
  • Know that Twitter handles and/or names may be used in the responses

Skinner will respond to a selection of the questions submitted, but not all of them, in a future entry on Scope.

Finally – and you may have already guessed this – an answer to any question submitted as part of this feature is meant to offer medical information, not medical advice. These answers are not a basis for any action or inaction, and they’re also not meant to replace the evaluation and determination of your doctor, who will address your specific medical needs and can make a diagnosis and give you the appropriate care.

Previously: Study calls for increased awareness for minorities and gay men following prostate cancer treatment, Making difficult choices about prostate cancer and To screen or not to screen? When it comes to prostate and breast cancers, that’s still the question
Photo by Alatryste

12 Responses to “ Ask Stanford Med: Urology chair taking questions on prostate cancer and the latest research ”

  1. Stanford Hospital to host free panel discussion about prostate cancer on Saturday | Scope Blog Says:

    […] addition to moderating the panel, Skinner is also taking questions this week on prostate health via the @SUMedicine Twitter feed and Scope as part of our […]

  2. GS Says:

    Previous research has found that men who eat one and a half servings of pan-fried red meat weekly have a 30% higher risk of being diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer. How does eating certain foods increase or decrease you prostate cancer risk?

  3. Peggy P. Says:

    My husband was successfully treated for stage II prostate cancer. I’ve read that aspirin may aid in prostate cancer recovery. What are your thoughts on research showing that aspirin may play a beneficial role in the treatment, or potentially the prevention, of prostate cancer?

  4. Greg Says:

    Hello,

    I am a 55 year old male recently diagnosed with prostate cancer. In 11/2011 my PSA level was 4.6. In 06/2012 my biopsy came back with a Gleason score of 3+4 from one pathology lab, and 3+3 on a second opinion from Sloan-Kettering. My questions are:
    (1) Is it OK to “watch and wait,” or should I proceed with treatment at this time?
    (2) My urologist recommends either DaVinci prostatectomy or brachytherapy. Which treatment option carries the lowest risk of side effects?

    Thank you for your time.
    Greg

  5. Ella Says:

    Findings published this week show that “stop-an-start hormone-deprivation therapy for localized prostate cancer doesn’t shorten overall survival compared to continuous treatment.” Dr. Skinner what are your thoughts on this type of intermittent therapy approach? Can it improve patients’ quality of life while being as effective as continuous treatment?

  6. kapm Says:

    Have been on the AS path for about a year now. Seeing increase is PSA (up to about 5.1 from 3.9) and due for biopsy next month. My “numbers” are very low (one core in 30 positive, less than 5%) and one doctor said it was as if I were a little pregnant. Have a 3 month protocol for testing PSA and DRE. Yearly biopsy. Your thoughts and feeling about when to leave AS and move to treatment? Particular type of treatment better than others for former AS people. 67 years old BTW.

    Thanks for time and sharing you knowledge.
    It is deeply appreciated by us all.

    kapm

  7. Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Sept. 2 | Scope Blog Says:

    […] Ask Stanford Med: Urology chair taking questions on prostate cancer and the latest research: Eila Skinner, MD, chair of the urology department at Stanford, is taking questions until Sept. 11 on prostate cancer, recommendations on PSA testing and the latest advancements in diagnosis and treatment for the disease. […]

  8. Final day to submit questions on prostate cancer to Stanford’s urology chair | Scope Blog Says:

    […] about the prevalence of prostate cancer and Skinner’s credentials can be found in our earlier post: Nearly two thirds are diagnosed in men aged 65 or older and one in six men in America will be […]

  9. JBL Says:

    How has new research on genes linked to prostate cancer helped scientists better understand how the disease develops? Additionally, how will this research lead to targeted therapies or improve prevention methods?

  10. M. Chiles Says:

    Dr. Skinner: What are some of the more promising research advancements related to prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment?

  11. Ask Stanford Med: Answers to your questions on prostate cancer and the latest research | Scope Blog Says:

    […] asks: Previous research has found that men who eat one and a half servings of pan-fried red meat weekly […]

  12. Roach Says:

    Can anyone tell me their thoughts on proton therapy?

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