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NIH to host Twitter chat on complementary medicine and children

An estimated 12 percent of children use some form of complementary medicine, such as herbs and dietary supplements, massage or acupuncture, according to the latest data from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM). But few large studies have been completed on the safety of such therapies in children, leaving some people with questions about the potential benefits or harm of the practices.

In an effort to provide answers to the questions of parents, practitioners and others, NCCAM is hosting a Twitter chat tomorrow at 10 a.m. Pacific time. To join the conversation, use the hashtag #nccamchat or follow @NCCAM.

During the chat, Twitter users will have an opportunity to ask questions about the use and safety of complementary health approaches in children. Lawrence Rosen, MD, a founding member and chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Integrative Medicine, and NCCAM expert Wendy J. Weber, PhD, will participate in the conversation.

Previously: Study shows meditation may lower teens’ risk of developing heart disease, New NIH series offers consumer-friendly tips on complementary health practices and Report highlights how integrative medicine is used in the U.S.
Photo by Wellcome Trust

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