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Relieving stress, anxiety and PTSD with emerging technologies

Last weekend at Medicine X, CNN contributor Amanda Enayati presented a talk on how emerging technologies can relieve stress, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorders. Today, Enayati posted a version of her presentation on CNN.

In the piece, she discusses the rapidly growing number of devices aimed at measuring and tracking our stress, and how future technologies, including some in development at Stanford, may help us better manage our mental health. She writes:

Not only will we start to design products that help us lower our stress levels, we will also figure out how to design products in existing categories -- for example, household appliances, computers, cars and websites -- that are less stressful.

Neema Moraveji, director of the Stanford Calming Technology Lab, is at work designing a calming e-mail reader that delivers and organizes messages in a less frenzied way.

"People are reconsidering the blind pursuit of technology as an end. Some of us in the tech community are thinking about the effects of digital toxins the same way engineers, policy-makers and designers consider environmental toxins," Moraveji said.

Previously: Countdown to Medicine X: Turning to emerging technologies to relieve stress, anxiety and PTSD, Firdaus Dhabhar discusses the positive effects of stress, Stanford health psychologist Kelly McGonigal discusses how stress shapes us and Stanford’s Robert Sapolsky talks stress and the brain

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