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Food Summit 3 being held at Stanford on Oct. 24

Food Summit 3 being held at Stanford on Oct. 24

Food Day – Oct. 24 – is fast approaching. Food researchers here will be celebrating by attending Food Summit 3, a two-part event for scientists, community activists and members of the general public with an interest in food systems research.

During the day, there will be a symposium for Stanford researchers and members of community-based food organizations. The agenda includes, among other things, presentations on three food-related research projects that grew out of Stanford-community partnerships started at last year’s Food Summit.

The evening features a forum for the general public that begins with a presentation by speaker, author and activist John Robbins, who is perhaps best known for his 1987 book “Diet for a New America.” His presentation will be followed by a panel discussion entitled “Farm Bill or Food Bill?” that features food activists from here and around the Bay Area.

I wrote more about the Stanford event in a release:

“Our longer-term goal is to build a food-systems research center on campus,” said Christopher Gardner, PhD, the associate professor of medicine who is organizing the summit. The engagement of all seven Stanford schools in a variety of food-related research projects gives Stanford a unique niche in addressing local, national and global food problems, Gardner said. “Of 7 billion people on the planet, a billion are hungry and nearly a billion are overweight or obese,” he said. “There’s enough food to go around, but how do you produce it and how do you distribute it? Those are systems issues in growing a sustainable-food movement that Stanford may be able to help solve.”

Both portions of the Food Summit are free; registration is available online.

Previously: Stanford expert discusses motivating Americans to make better nutritional choices, Food, glorious food: Stanford’s first food summit and Stanford researchers seek interdisciplinary solutions to food-related problems

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