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Stanford forum on how food policies affect our nation’s obesity rates posted online

Stanford forum on how food policies affect our nation’s obesity rates posted online

Two weeks ago, the Stanford Health Policy Forum hosted an event examining the reasons why we get fat and how different diet trends and food policies affect our nation’s obesity rates. The forum featured a conversation between science writer Gary Taubes and Christopher Gardner, PhD, director of Nutrition Studies at the Stanford Prevention Research Center. During the discussion, Paul Costello, the medical school’s chief communications officer, talked to Taubes and Gardner about Americans’ misconceptions about food, diet and nutrition, the driving forces behind the obesity surge of the late-80s and the path to a healthier, leaner lifestyle.

Previously: Forum to focus on how food policies affect our nation’s obesity ratesFour states examine their cultural environment to reduce obesity rates and Examining why instilling healthy eating and exercise habits in children may not prevent obesity later in life

3 Responses to “ Stanford forum on how food policies affect our nation’s obesity rates posted online ”

  1. tyler massas Says:

    QUESTION: Have there been any good studies on groups of obese individuals that do not eat high amounts of carbohydrate? Meaning — is there such thing as an obese person that doesn’t eat a lot of carbs? The same question could be asked for vegetable oil, fructose, and dairy. Thanks. Tyler

  2. Danny Stan Says:

    From what I read there is a study where it says that people depressed (with low serotonin levels) tend to eat more carbs because, carbs have tryptophan an aminoacid that makes serotonin in the body (serotonin levels increased will will change the mood of a person from sad to happy)

  3. Richard James Says:

    Aug. 5, 2008 — Stanford University researchers peering at history’s footprints on human DNA have found new evidence for how prehistoric people shared knowledge that advanced civilization.
    The above article raises a research question in regard to nutrition. With the present meat vs. plant based diet controversy I am curious as to whether the life spans/disease processes of the divergant pastoralists and crop growers is radically different.

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