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When the journalist becomes the patient

I just learned of a new Reuters blog, Cancer in Context, written by a reporter who was recently diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer. Debra Sherman has chosen to talk publicly about her experience ("There seems no reason to stop [writing health stories] now that my health is so compromised," she wrote], and her aim for the blog is to use her journalistic skills to "report on the latest cancer research from the perspective of a patient." I found her introductory post from earlier this month quite poignant:

As a Reuters journalist I have been writing about medical technology and healthcare for more than a decade. I’ve covered the major medical meetings, including the big one on cancer. I’ve written stories about new cancer drugs and treatments, about how many more survive the disease (true for breast, colon and some other forms, though not so much for lung cancer), and how a diagnosis can lead to bankruptcy, even for those with health insurance.

I wrote those stories objectively and never imagined any would ever apply to me.

Previously: A journalist opens up about her struggles with depression and anxiety and Fighting a stage IV cancer diagnosis

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