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Orthopedics, Pain, Parenting, Pediatrics

On being a parent with chronic pain

Mom3The Atlantic posted a moving piece today written by a mother whose severe scoliosis has left her body in a near-constant state of pain. The author, Rachel Rabkin Peachman, points to a recent review of scientific literature documenting how children of parents with chronic pain are affected by their mothers’ and fathers’ condition:

The results, published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, are, well, painful to read. It turns out that children whose parents experience chronic pain are at increased risk for adjustment problems and behavioral issues, and are more likely to complain of pain themselves. The whole family suffers.

Peachman details some of the studies’ findings. She also describes her own history with pain and parenting, and discusses the times she was unable to pick up and soothe her crying daughter. She writes:

Science may say the odds are against parents with chronic pain. And I know there are days I’m sidelined and short-tempered. But I’m determined to raise children who feel supported, secure, and loved. I don’t know what my future holds—surgery, therapies, or a lifetime of pain. But I have to believe that despite a deteriorating body, it’s possible to be a successful mother.

The entire piece is worth a read.

Previously: Image of the Week: The agony of painStanford researchers address the complexities of chronic painLetting go of control during chronic illness or pain and Chronic illness in childhood: One patient’s story
Photo by Miki Yoshihito

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