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Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of March 16

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Match Day 2014: Good luck, medical students!: Medical students at Stanford, and thousands more around the United States, gathered for the annual Match Day celebration. Surrounded by family, friends and faculty members, students opened envelopes to learn where they would be “matched” for their residencies.

Free DIY microscope kits to citizen scientists with inspiring project ideas: Through the Ten Thousand Microscope Project, Manu Prakash is giving away 10,000 build-your-own paper microscope kits to citizen scientists with the most inspiring ideas for how to use his new invention, called the Foldscope.

Life-saving dollar-a-dose rotavirus vaccine attains clinical success in advanced India trial: A new rotavirus vaccine has leaped the safety and efficacy thresholds of a late-stage clinical trial, in which more than 6,500 Indian infants were inoculated, and will likely become available in that country for less than a dollar a dose. Stanford’s Harry Greenberg, MD, is co-author of both a study and an accompanying perspective piece published in The Lancet.

Restless legs syndrome, most common in old age, appears to be programmed in the womb: A group led by Juliane Winkelmann, MD, professor of neurology, has pinpointed for the first time the anatomical region in the brain where the programming for restless leg syndrome takes place.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

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