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How sleep benefits those with a rare neurological disease

In the latest Huffington Post blog entry from the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, a pediatric neurologist highlights a rare neurological disease that's characterized by an improvement of symptoms after sleep. Mara Cvejic, MD, shares the dramatic story of a young patient, writing:

As a sleep physician today, Jane's face still haunts me -- but in a good way. The miracles of sleep are too numerous for the scope of this article, but there is plenty of undisputed evidence to show that healthy sleep improves our mood, our heart, our ability to eat healthy, to exercise, and perform at our best during the day at work or school. It is even linked to lower cancer rates. But can it take away what appears to be Parkinson's disease and make a little girl walk? Oddly, that answer is yes. Jane had Segawa's disease.

Read on for the full story.

Previously: Stanford center launches Huffington Post blog on the “very mysterious process” of sleep

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