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Wireless stick-on patch could make continuous health monitoring more flexible and practical

Wireless stick-on patch could make continuous health monitoring more flexible and practical

Stress tests or sleep studies are two examples of when long-term clinical monitoring are necessary. But bulky wires, sensors, or tape used during these studies can inhibit the natural movements of test subjects and potentially skew outcomes. In an effort to solve this issue, researchers at Northwestern University developed a wearable patch that adheres to the skin, easily stretches and moves with the body, gathers physiological statistics, and can send wireless updates to a cellphone or computer.

A recent post on Futurity offers more details about how the device, which stick to the skin like a temporary tattoo, was designed:

Researchers turned to soft microfluidic designs to address the challenge of integrating relatively big, bulky chips with the soft, elastic base of the patch. The patch is constructed of a thin elastic envelope filled with fluid. The chip components are suspended on tiny raised support points, bonding them to the underlying patch but allowing the patch to stretch and move.

One of the biggest engineering feats of the patch is the design of the tiny, squiggly wires connecting the electronics components—radios, power inductors, sensors, and more. The serpentine-shaped wires are folded like origami, so that no matter which way the patch bends, twists or stretches, the wires can unfold in any direction to accommodate the motion. Since the wires stretch, the chips don’t have to.

The article goes on to discuss the potential of wearable electronic devices in health care, including the possibility of detecting motions associated with Parkinson’s disease at its onset.

Previously: Ultra-thin flexible device offers non-invasive method of monitoring heart health, blood pressure, New method for developing flexible nanowire electronics could yield ultrasensitive biosensors and Stanford researchers develop a new biosensor chip that could speed drug development

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