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Health initiatives at the White House gain popularity

Health initiatives at the White House gain popularity

Barack Obama, Michelle ObamaIn case you missed it, The Washington Post recently took a look at how the Obamas are bringing flavors of healthy eating and activity into their home. An article describes how a culture of health drives not only President and First Lady Obama, but also influences their family, members of the current administration and nation-wide initiatives.

From the piece:

Earlier this year, there was an intense battle for bragging rights inside the complex as teams of six with names such as “Runnin’ Like Amtrak,” from Vice President Biden’s staff, and “Team Engage (Our Core),” from the Office of Public Engagement, earned a point for every 30 minutes of “moderate-to-vigorous physical activity” performed each day. Each team totaled its points each week.

“The culture here has shifted pretty dramatically, in direct ways and indirect ways, based on their leadership,” said Sam Kass, executive director of first lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move initiative and the White House senior policy adviser for nutrition policy. “I think we really live that. I think that’s been a transformation for the kitchen

In Obamaworld, the methods staff members use to reach their diet and fitness goals reflect their faith in the power of technology and data. Council of Economic Advisers Chairman Jason Furman, [PhD,] who got kudos from the president after he lost 50 pounds, surveyed the scientific literature on weight loss, tracked his food consumption and rate of physical behavior electronically and converted it into a spreadsheet to analyze it properly.

Past presidents and presidential candidates have taken different stances on eating and exercise behavior; as the article notes, “the cultural shift has political consequences.”

Previously: Classroom cupcakes: Should “party foods” at schools be limited?, White House announces “Apps for Healthy Kids” winners and An edible forest grows in Richmond: Urban gardening program teaches kids about food, nutrition
Photo by ASSOCIATED PRESS

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