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Stanford reconstructive surgeon Jill Helms reminds us that "beauty isn't defined by our faces alone"

Jill Helms, PhD, a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at Stanford, leads a team of scientists that are working on methods to activate a patient’s own stem cells at the site of an injury to speed up tissue healing. In this TEDxStanford video, Helms discusses how surgical scars can sometimes impede growth of a patient's body, such as the repair of a child's cleft palate, and the potential of using stem cells to enhance the body's natural healing process.

As previously mentioned here, Helms delivered a talk on the topic of beauty reconsidered, and she reminds us at the end of the video that "beauty isn't defined by our faces alone." She says, "Beauty is compassion, kindness and warmth, and that's internal beauty. That's the most important beauty."

Previously: A spotlight on TEDxStanford’s “awe-inspiring” and “deeply moving” talks and Stanford study shows protein bath may rev up sluggish bone-forming cells

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