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Chronic Disease, Public Health, Research, Technology

More evidence that text message programs can help in managing diabetes

mobile_phone_6.16.14Previous research has shown that automated daily text messages can increase medication adherence among diabetic patients and reduce their repeated visits to the emergency room. Now new research offers more evidence that text-message-based programs are an effective tool in helping in those with type 2 diabetes improve their glycemic control.

For the study, researchers from the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute partnered with a San Diego-based community clinic providing care to a large percentage of Latino patients with type 2 diabetes. A group of 126 patients were randomly assigned to receive either standard care alone or standard care combined with frequent text messages. According to a release:

Standard care consisted of regular visits with a primary care physician and a brief computerized presentation conducted in English or Spanish that included; diabetes nutrition standards; desired targets for blood sugar, cholesterol and blood pressure; and medications recommended to achieve control.

For the text messaging group, the same standard care was provided but in addition messages were sent to their mobile devices at random times throughout the week. The messages focused on healthy nutrition tips, the benefits of physical activity and medication adherence, and requests to check blood sugar and send back results. Two to three messages were sent each day at the beginning of study enrollment, and the frequency tapered off over a six-month period.

“At the six-month mark, we found that the Dulce Digital [study] participants had a significantly larger decrease in hemoglobin A1c test levels than the control group,” said [Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD, corporate vice president for the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute.]

Noting the promise of mobile phones to aide low-income populations in managing chronic diseases, Philis-Tsimikas said in the release, “We found that by using text messages we were able to circumvent many of the barriers these patients face, such as lack of transportation or childcare, while still being able to expand the reach of diabetes care and education.”

The findings were presented on Friday at the 74th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association in San Francisco.

Previously: Text message program helps smokers “stay focused on quitting”, Text message reminders shown effective in boosting flu shot rates among pregnant women and Texts may help people with diabetes manage care
Via HealthCanal
Photo by Wolfman-K

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