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PCOS linked with higher risk of type 2 diabetes even in young women who are not overweight, study finds

Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome, which is present in 5 to 10 percent of women of childbearing age and is associated with reproductive and metabolic dysfunction, may be at higher risk for type 2 diabetes. Previous research has shown this correlation in women who are also overweight; now, an Australian study has shown that even young women with PCOS who are not overweight may be at a significantly higher risk for developing diabetes.

From a release:

Over 6000 women aged between 25-28 years were monitored for nine years, including 500 with diagnosed PCOS. The incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes was three to five times higher in women with PCOS. Crucially, obesity, a key trigger for type 2 diabetes, was not an important trigger in women with PCOS.
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The women studied were aged 25-28 in 2003 and were followed over 9 years until age 34 to 37 years in 2012.

Findings from the large-scale epidemiological study were presented at the recent joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago.

“Our research found that there is a clear link between PCOS and diabetes," study author Helena Teede, PhD, said in the release. "However, PCOS is not a well-recognised diabetes risk factor and many young women with the condition don't get regular diabetes screening even pre pregnancy, despite recommendations from the Australian PCOS evidence based guidelines.”

Previously: Study shows bigger breakfast may help women with PCOS manage symptoms and NIH study suggests progestin in infertility treatment for women with PCOS may be counterproductive

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