Published by
Stanford Medicine

Cancer, Clinical Trials, Pediatrics, Public Health, Research

Researchers call for broader age limits for cancer trials to increase participation of teenage patients

Researchers call for broader age limits for cancer trials to increase participation of teenage patients

Findings published today in the Lancet Oncology highlight the need to increase the flexibility of age limits for cancer trials so that more teenage patients have access to experimental treatments. “Right now too many of our young patients are needlessly falling through the gap between paediatric and adult cancer trials,” said Lorna Fern, PhD, who led the study and co-ordinates research for the Teenage and Young Adult Clinical Studies Group of the UK-based National Cancer Research Institute.

In the study (subscription required), researchers examined strategies to boost participation of teens and young adults diagnosed with cancer in clinical trials. The study involved 68,275 patients, aged 0-59 years, who were diagnosed with cancer within a five-year window. According to a release:

The study showed [trials designed with broader age limits] led to a 13 per cent rise in 15-19 year old cancer patients taking part in clinical trials between 2005 and 2010 (from 24 to 37 per cent), and a five per cent rise in 20-24 year olds (from 13 to 18 per cent). Children under 14 taking part in trials rose by six per cent (from 52 to 58 per cent).

This rise was due to the increase in availability and access to trials for young people, increased awareness from healthcare professionals, patients and the public about research and importantly the opening of trials with broader age limits which allow older teenagers and young adults to enter trials.

Fern added, “By encouraging doctors to take into account the full age range of patients affected by individual types of cancer, we’ve shown that it’s possible to design trials that include teenage cancer patients and, importantly, that better match the underlying biology of the disease and the people affected.”

Previously: High rates of incarceration among black men could be skewing study results, Stanford researchers examine disparities in use of quality cancer centers and NPR explores the need for improving diversity in clinical trials

Comment


Please read our comments policy before posting

Stanford Medicine Resources: