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Genome testing for children: What parents should consider

Genome testing: Would you do it?

Okay, next question: Would you have your child's whole genome tested?

In the recent issue of Stanford Medicine News, Louanne Hudgins, MD, chief of medical genetics and director of perinatal genetics at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, weighs in on the issue: "I strongly advise parents against whole-genome testing for their children unless performed in the context of a medical evaluation following formal counseling regarding its utility, limitations and possible unrelated findings," she said.

In the piece, Hudgins comments on privacy and ethics considerations, and explains why what we partially know (for instance, if your child is found to have a gene predisposing him or her to a disease) can sometimes provide more cause for worry or false hope than helpful or conclusive information.

The whole piece (a short one) is worth a read.

Previously: Stanford patient on having her genome sequenced: “This is the right thing to do for our family”, Personal molecular profiling detects diseases earlier, Stanford geneticist discusses genomics and medicine in TEDMED talk and Medical practice, patents, and “custom children”: A look at the future of reproductive medicine

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