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Regular exercise may help young girls struggling with depression

Regular exercise may help young girls struggling with depression

Girls running Scope Blog

Staying physically fit may help keep depression at bay for young girls, a study recently presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association in Washington D.C. showed. On Thursday, the findings were reported in an article in U.S. News & World Report that pointed to a trend between fitness levels and depression in sixth grade girls.

“We don’t know exactly why there is a link [between fitness levels and depression], but it’s probably a number of things,” Camilio Ruggero, PhD, lead researcher and assistant professor at the University of North Texas, said in the article. “It might be better self-esteem, healthier weight or getting more positive reinforcements that go along with being active, and/or it could be more biological. We know certain proteins and hormones associated with less depression respond to increased exercise.”

The article goes on to say that the trend between fitness levels and depression in boys was not as statistically significant. Although the findings could not show a direct link between the two, they do suggest that for middle school children, staying active and being physically fit is an important piece of the puzzle for emotional well-being.

Jen Baxter is a freelance writer and photographer. After spending eight years working for Kaiser Permanente Health plan she took a self-imposed sabbatical to travel around South East Asia and become a blogger. She enjoys writing about nutrition, meditation, and mental health, and finding personal stories that inspire people to take responsibility for their own well-being. Her website and blog can be found at www.jenbaxter.com.

Previously: Using fMRI to understand and potentially prevent depression in girls, Yoga classes may boost high school students’ mental well- being and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital partners with high schools on student mental health programs
Photo by Sangudo

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