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Study shows number of American teens using sunscreen is declining

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Despite an increase in cases of melanoma, the most dangerous type of skin cancer, growing percentage of high school students get a failing grade when it comes to using sunscreen. HealthDay reports:

The number of U.S. teens using sunscreen dropped nearly 12 percent in the last decade, a new report shows.

During that same time period, the number of teens using indoor tanning beds barely decreased. Both indoor tanning and failure to use sunscreen increase the risk of skin cancers, including deadly melanomas, the researchers noted.

“Unfortunately, we found a decrease in the overall percentage of teens who reported wearing sunscreen, from 67.7 percent in 2001 to 56.1 percent in 2011,” said lead researcher Corey Basch, an associate professor in the department of public health at William Paterson University in Wayne, N.J.

“Using sun-protective behaviors like applying sunscreen and avoiding intentional exposure to tanning devices will be key [to lowering cancer risk],” she added.

Use of indoor tanning devices by white girls decreased only slightly, from 37 percent in 2009 to 29 percent in 2011, she said.

Study authors say more research is need to understand why teens aren’t following national guidelines regarding sun protection.

Previously: Melanoma rates exceed rates of lung cancer in some areas, Beat the heat – and protect your skin from the sun, Working to protect athletes from sun dangers and Stanford study: Young men more likely to succumb to melanoma
Photo by Alex Liivet

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