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Ivy and Bean help encourage kids to get vaccinated

Ivy and Bean2Last week, I took my two little boys to get their shots, including the MMR vaccine that protects against measles, mumps and rubella. Although, as a mom, it's easy for me to understand the value of vaccines, I'm not sure my preschooler was completely convinced that getting poked in the arm was a great idea.

That's why I am thrilled to see "Ivy and Bean vs. The Measles," a set of posters and other educational materials that Sophie Blackall, the illustrator of the popular series of children's books, has produced in collaboration with the Measles and Rubella Initiative. Blackall's illustrations show Bean, one of the book's two heroines, devising a series of unconventional strategies for avoiding the measles: wear a biohazard suit for the rest of your life, get adopted by a polar bear, or (my personal favorite) cover yourself in a 6-inch protective layer of lard.

"Or," says Ivy, "get vaccinated!"

My son would probably be most interested in Bean's suggestion to "Move to the moon!" He loves all things outer space-related, and I love the idea of finding something at our doctor's office that would spark his interest and help me explain to him why he needs that brief poke in the arm.

Bravo, Ivy and Bean!

Via Shots
Previously: Side effects of childhood vaccines are extremely rare, new study finds, Measles is disappearing from the Western hemisphere and Tips for parents on back-to-school vaccinations
Artwork by Sophie Blackall

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