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Neighborhood’s “walkability” helps older adults maintain physical and cognitive health

3275748024_c4914d4ae0_zLiving in a walkable neighborhood could be an important factor in helping older adults maintain their physical and cognitive health, according to new research from the University of Kansas.

In the small study, researchers monitored a group of adults diagnosed with mild Alzheimer's disease and compared them to those without any cognitive impairment. Over a two-year period, individuals completed cognitive tests designed to measure attention, verbal memory and mental status. The "walkability" of participants' neighborhoods was determined using geographic information systems (GIS). Medical News Today reports:

Results from the study suggest that communities that are easier to walk in are linked to better physical health outcomes - such as lower body mass and blood pressure - and cognition - including better memory.

[Researchers] believe their findings could benefit older adults, health care professionals, caregivers and even architects and urban planners.

Finding also showed that environments with more complex layouts appeared to aid residents in staying mentally sharp, rather than confusing them. Researchers presented their findings over the weekend at the Gerontological Society of America's annual meeting in Washington, DC.

Previously: Walking and aging: A historical perspective, Even old brains can stay healthy, says Stanford neurologist,  Exercise and your brain: Stanford research highlighted on NIH Director’s blog , Moderate exercise program for older adults reduces mobility disability, study shows and Creating safer neighborhoods for healthier lifestyles
Photo by Ed Yourdon

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