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The role of nutrition in diabetes prevention and management

Can certain diets help patients prevent or manage their diabetes? Which foods are best for diabetics and which ones should they avoid? If you increase your coffee consumption, will it reduce your risk of diabetes? Kathleen Kenny, MD, a clinical associate professor at Stanford, and Jessica Shipley, a clinical dietitian at Stanford Hospital & Clinics, answered these questions and others about diabetes and nutrition in a recent Stanford Health Library talk.

In the above video, Kenny and Shipley also discuss the glycemic index and how it should be used to tailor dietary choices; examine how Mediterranean, low-carb and low-calorie diets affect diabetes; and explain how eating healthy can prevent or reverse the disease. The lecture is a must-watch for anyone wanting to make healthier food choices to benefit their health.

This video is the final lecture in a three-part series addressing important questions related to diabetes and lifestyle choices.

Previously: Diabetes and nutrition: Healthy holiday eating tips, red meat and disease risk, and going vegetarian, Diabetes and nutrition: Why healthy eating is a key component of prevention and management, Diabetes self-management program helps at-risk teens and their families make healthier choices and New evidence for a direct sugar-to-diabetes link, Examining how diet soft drinks impact your health

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