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Diversity is initial focus of new Stanford lecture series

How often does a psychiatrist stop to chat with a bioengineer? Or a first-year medical student with an established postdoc? At Stanford, more often than you might think, yet there's always room for improvement, building community and promoting dialogue.

Hence the Dean’s Lecture Series, a new series launched by none other than the dean himself, Lloyd B. Minor, MD.

Initially, the series will focus on diversity, kicking off Jan. 23 with a presentation by Rosalind Hudnell, the chief diversity officer and global director of education and external relations at Intel Corporation. (Her talk is timely, given Intel's announcement yesterday that they're allocating $300 million "to improve the diversity of the company’s work force, attract more women and minorities to the technology field and make the industry more hospitable to them once they get there.")

Minor said he launched the lecture series to unite students, faculty and staff and to spark dialogue on issues of importance. As for the first topic: “We all benefit from the transformative power of diversity,” he said. “It is an integral part of what it means to lead the biomedical revolution and a core value of the Stanford Medicine community.”

Following Hudnell's inaugural talk, Vivek Wadhwa, MBA, a fellow at the Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford, will speak on Feb. 20, and Ruth Simmons, PhD, president emerita of Brown University, will speak on May 1. All lectures will be held from 12 to 1 p.m. in Berg Hall at the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge on campus.

I'll be there. How 'bout you?

Previously: NIH selects Hannah Valantine as first chief officer for scientific workforce diversity, Report explores student diversity in medical schools and Lloyd B. Minor, Stanford medical school's dean, shares five principles of leadership
Photo by geralt

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