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A medical invention that brings tears to your eyes

dry-eye-implantMore than 20 million Americans suffer from dry eye, a painful condition where a personal’s lacrimal glands don’t create enough tears to lubricate the surface of the eye.

But relief is around the corner for these sufferers - a tiny implantable device that stimulates natural tear production on a long-term basis is currently in clinical trials. The device increases tear volume by delivering micro-electrical pulses to the lacrimal gland. It's inserted into the mucus lining of the sinus cavity or under the skin beneath the eyebrow. Tear delivery rates can be adjusted manually with a wireless controller. (You can watch a video of this device producing tears, below.)

This clever invention is the brainchild of bioengineer and former Stanford Biodesign fellow Michael Ackermann, PhD, who says he spent a good part of his boyhood in Louisville, Kentucky, taking apart things like VCRs, radios and weed-whackers.

“My parents wanted me to be a doctor, but it was very clear from a young age that I was going to be an engineer,” said Ackermann.

He's now at the helm of Oculeve, a 20-person startup dedicated to helping people with dry-eye. Ackermann’s tale of how he took one crazy idea and turned it into a product that has the potential to help millions of people is featured in the latest issue of Inside Stanford Medicine.

More than one person’s story, it's another example of the efficacy of the Stanford Biodesign training program, whose fellows have started 36 medtech companies and filed more than 200 patents, all of which have reached 250,000-plus patients.

Previously: Crying without tears unlocks the mystery of a new genetic disease, Instagram for eyes: Stanford ophthalmologists develop low-cost device to ease image sharing and Stanford-developed eye implant could work with smartphone to improve glaucoma treatments
Photo and video by Michael Ackermann

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