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Seven ways laughter can improve your well-being

3336353424_df38db0c8a_zEveryone enjoys a good laugh, but who actually makes time for it in their lives? Sure, we like hearing a funny joke, talking to people with a good sense of humor and watching comedies. But few of us take our laughs seriously (no pun intended!) nor do we make a concerted effort to laugh more. But we should! The science of laughter - though still preliminary - suggests that it has tremendous benefits for our health and psychological well-being.

Laughter can improve your relationships. According to a recent study led by research assistant Alan Gray of University College London, the act of laughing can make you more open to new people and can help you build relationships.

Laughter may also boost memory and lower stress. A study by researchers at Loma Linda University found that laughter can sharpen your ability to remember things while also reducing the stress hormone, cortisol, especially in older people.

Laughter may make you more resilient. Ever had nervous laughter in an awkward or difficult situation? That’s because laughter may help you regulate your emotions in the face of challenge, according to a study led by Yale psychologist Erica J. Boothby, PhD.

Laughter can improve your health. A study of diabetic patients by Lee S. Berk, PhD, and Stanley A. Tan, MD, of Loma Linda University found that laughing can lower stress and inflammation and increase good cholesterol. Ever found yourself laughing while telling a joke or funny story? Maybe you were anticipating the ending and laughed your way through the end of the joke? Another study by Berk and Tan suggests that just anticipating a funny event boosted immune function while decreasing stress-related hormones.

Laughter can make you a better learner. When we are trying to learn something new, we usually are pretty serious, but research by Mark Shatz, PhD, and Frank LoSchiavo, PhD, of Ohio University show that a good laugh while learning new material will help you engage with it more!

Laughter can make you more attractive.  Another recent study by Shatz and LoSchiavo shows that humor and playfulness are highly valued traits in potential romantic partners.

Laughter can help you make the world a better place. Why? It's contagious. At least on the level of the brain, according to research by Sophie Scott, PhD, of University College London.

Emma Seppala, PhD, is associate director of Stanford’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education and a research psychologist at the School of Medicine. She is also a certified yoga, pilates, breath work and meditation instructor. A version of this piece originally appeared on Psychology Today.

Photo by Arnet Gill

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