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Pediatric health expert Alan Guttmacher outlines key issues facing children’s health today

The inaugural Childx conference was held here last month, and video interviews featuring keynote speakers, panelists and moderators are now on the Stanford YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of driving innovation in maternal and child health, we’ll be featuring a selection of the videos this month on Scope.

During his keynote speech at Stanford's recent Childx conference, Alan Guttmacher, MD, director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Development, told attendees, "We need to be a society that values children.”

In the above video, Guttmacher emphasizes this point as he outlines key issues facing children's health today. He explains that it's the dawn of a new era in medical research with the potential to improve the lives of children throughout their life span. To make a lasting difference in children's lives, he says, research needs to go beyond the medical approach and integrate social and environmental factors. He highlights the example of preterm birth, saying that while we've made strides in reducing the infant mortality rate of babies born too early, more needs to be done to understand the causes of preterm birth and prevent it.

Watch the full interview to learn more about why investing in pediatrics research can help the generations of tomorrow build a healthier future.

Previously: “It’s not just science fiction anymore”: Childx speakers talk stem cell and gene therapy, Global health and precision medicine: Highlights from day two of Stanford’s Childx conference, Innovating for kids’ health: More from first day of Stanford’s Childx, “What we’re really talking about is changing the arc of children’s lives:” Stanford’s Childx kicks off and Countdown to Childx: Q&A with pediatric health expert Alan Guttmacher

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