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Stanford law professor uses behavioral psychology to promote stress reduction in students

6145155310_258dc36f9e_zGoing back to school inspired Stanford law professor Joseph Bankman, JD, with more than new perspectives on his legal work. Through his experience in the Palo Alto University/Stanford School of Medicine joint PsyD (doctor of psychology) program, Bankman thought of a way to connect what he was learning about behavioral psychology with what he sees everyday in his students. He started a program that offers first-year law students an emotional health seminar using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to help them positively respond to situations that induce stress and anxiety.

Stanford News has the story, in which Bankman is quoted:

I have all these brilliant students whom I can help by giving them some useful knowledge and improving their analytical skills. But, as I came to realize over the years, if they crash and burn it will not be because they lack these necessary skills.  It will be because they lack emotional resilience to cope with the stresses and challenges of a demanding professional career.  Like millions of others, they need help with anxiety and, for some, depression.

The two-hour course includes an introduction to the principles of CBT and some simple exercises, and it has been offered on a voluntary basis for the past two years. Student response has been overwhelmingly positive: in one course, 100 percent said it should be offered again, and many reported that the benefits extended past school and into their personal lives.

In the news report, Bankman says he is observing a new focus on the emotional well-being of students in both research and  institutions, and he hopes the trend will continue.

Previously: A conversation with Scott Stossel, author of My Age of Anxiety, Benefits of mindfulness program for med students, Reframing reactions could reduce symptoms of social anxiety disorder, Stanford study shows and A closer look at depression and distress among medical students
Photo by Tulane Public Relations

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