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Live tweeting from Association of Health Care Journalists conference

10948923353_90e2273cdc_zStarting tomorrow morning, we'll be live tweeting from the Association of Health Care Journalists 2015 conference, which is being held in Santa Clara, Calif. and is co-hosted by Stanford Medicine.

The conference brings together hundreds of the top journalists who cover health care and, thanks to its proximity to our campus, also includes numerous top Stanford medical experts.

We'll start our tweeting efforts on Friday morning at 9 a.m. Pacific time with "Ebola and Ebolanoia: Covering outbreaks responsibly," a panel discussion that includes Michele Barry, MD, director of the Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health. At 10:40 a.m., Henry Lee, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics, and Amen Ness, MD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, will participate in a discussion on "High-risk obstetrics: Challenges of very preterm births."And later in the day, at 4:20 p.m., we'll be there as Michael Snyder, PhD, chair of the Department of Genetics, discusses "How big data might revolutionize medical research and treatment."

Early Saturday, we'll dive into the brain with Amit Etkin, MD, PhD, and Michael Greicius, MD, MPH. Their session, "Inside the living brain: What have we learned, and what's next?", begins at 9 a.m. Next, at 10:40 a.m., George Sledge, Jr., MD, will discuss "Cancer as a chronic condition." Finally, at 3 p.m., Dean Lloyd Minor, MD, will join a panel discussion on "The shifting demands in health provider education."

We'll be using the hashtag #AHCJ15 and tweeting from @StanfordMed. And we'll be featuring blog posts on the conference - including one on a kickoff talk by physician-author Abraham Verghese, MD, - here on Scope.

Photo by Esther Vargas

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