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Big Data in Biomedicine conference kicks off today

14243103692_67ec6354f0_zThe third annual Big Data in Biomedicine conference kicks off today on the Stanford campus. The three-day event brings together thought leaders from academia, information technology companies, venture capital firms and public health institutions to explore opportunities for extracting knowledge from the rapidly growing reservoirs of health and medical information to transform how we diagnose, treat and prevent disease.

The year's program will cover the intersection of disciplines as widespread as genomics, population health, neuroimaging and immunology; it will also touch on crowdsourcing, ethical and legal issues and “learning” health systems. Delivering the opening keynote will be Sharon Terry, president and CEO of Genetic Alliance. Other keynote speakers include Kathy Hudson, PhD, deputy director for science, outreach and policy at the National Institutes of Health; France Córdova, PhD, director of the National Science Foundation; Michael Levitt, PhD, professor of structural biology at Stanford and recipient of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry; and Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of Stanford's School of Medicine.

Those unable to attend in person can tune in to the live webcast via the conference website. We'll also be live tweeting the keynote talks and other proceedings from the conference; you can follow the coverage on the @StanfordMed feed or by using the hashtag #bigdatamed.

Previously: Countdown to Big Data in Biomedicine: Leveraging big data technology to advance genomics, Countdown to Big Data in Biomedicine: Mining medical records to identify patterns in public health and Harnessing mobile health technologies to transform human health
Photo from the 2014 Big Data in Biomedicine conference by Saul Bromberger

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