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Using the “flipped classroom” model to bring medical education into the 21st century

To make better use of the fixed amount of instructional time available to train doctors, Stanford and four other institutions are collaborating with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation on an initiative to dramatically change medical education. They're doing this by reversing the traditional teaching method of classroom time being reserved for lectures and problem-solving exercises being completed outside of school as homework. This "flipped classroom" model aims to help students engage with the material that they're learning and create a foundational context for this new knowledge so they're more prepared to apply it at the bedside.

The above video describes the initiative and how educators are creating new interactive teaching tools to integrate the basic science curricula with the diseases, infections and conditions that students will see during their clinical training. As mentioned in a previous post on Scope, students have been involved in every step of the process to make sure the new curriculum is clear, compelling and relevant. "It's really rewarding to have this opportunity to impact the education of other medical students all across the country," Jennifer DeCoste-Lopez, a final-year Stanford medical student, comments.

Stanford is partnering on the initiative with Duke University, the University of Michigan, the University of California at San Francisco, and the University of Washington.

Previously: Stanford Medicine’s Lloyd Minor on re-conceiving medical educationFlip it up: How the flipped classroom boosts faculty interest in teaching, A closer look at using the “flipped classroom” model at the School of MedicineUsing technology and more to reimagine medical education and Using the "flipped classroom" model to re-imagine medical education

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