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A call to action to improve balance and reduce stress in the lives of resident physicians

4086639111_a7e7a56912_zIn November of 2010, those in Stanford's general surgery training program experienced an indescribable loss when a recently graduated surgical resident, Greg Feldman, MD, committed suicide. His death wound up being a call to action that brought about the Balance in Life program at Stanford, according to program founder Ralph S. Greco, MD.

With the Balance in Life program now in its fourth year, Greco; chief surgical resident Arghavan Salles, MD, PhD; and general surgery resident Cara A. Liebert, MD, have learned much about the daily stresses that resident physicians face. In a recent published JAMA Surgery opinion piece they wrote:

As physicians, we spend a significant amount of time counseling our patients on how to live healthier lives. Ironically, as trainees and practicing physicians, we often do not prioritize our own physical and psychological health.

...

A recent national survey found that 40% of surgeons were burnt out and that 30% had symptoms of depression. Another study reported that 6% of surgeons experienced suicidal ideation in the preceding 12 months. Perhaps most startling, there are roughly 300 to 400 physicians who die by suicide per year—the equivalent of 3 medical school graduating classes.

Greco, Salles and Liebert explain that the Balance in Life program is specifically designed to help resident physicians cope with these stresses by addressing the well-being of their professional, physical, psychological and social lives. To accomplish this goal, the program offers mentorship and leadership training activities; dining and health-care options that are tailored to the residents' busy schedules and needs; confidential meetings with an expert psychologist; and social events and outdoor activities that foster support among residents.

The authors concede that the program may not fix every stressful problem that their residents face, but it does let the residents know that their well-being is important and valued. "This may be the most profound, albeit intangible, contribution of Balance in Life," the authors write.

Although the program (and the JAMA article) is geared for people in the medical field, it's not much of a stretch to see how its core principles can apply to any work setting. Learning how to manage stress and reach out to colleagues for support is a valuable skill and, as the authors write, to provide expert care for others you must first take good care of yourself.

Previously: After work, a Stanford surgeon brings stones to lifeSurgeon offers his perspective on balancing life and workProgram for residents reflects “massive change” in surgeon mentality, New surgeons take time out for mental health and Helping those in academic medicine to both “work and live well”
Photo by Gabriel S. Delgado C.

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