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Green roofs are not just good for the environment, they boost productivity, study shows

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Boosting productivity can be as simple as looking at a grassy roof for just forty seconds, conclude researchers at the University of Melbourne. It's been shown that contact with nature can relieve stress and improve concentration and mood, but this is one of the first studies to see if novel urban manifestations of greenery can have the same effect.

The study, published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology and led by Kate Lee of Melbourne's Green Infrastructure Research Group, involved giving students a mindless computer task to do in a city office building with a brief break spent looking at a picture of either a lush green roof or bare concrete roof. Those who looked at the green one made significantly fewer mistakes and showed better concentration in the second half of the task. The study was based on the idea of "attention restoration" through microbreaks lasting under a minute, which happen spontaneously throughout the work day.

Lee is quoted in a press release:

We know that green roofs are great for the environment, but now we can say that they boost attention too. Imagine the impact that has for thousands of employees working in nearby offices... It's really important to have micro-breaks. It's something that a lot of us do naturally when we're stressed or mentally fatigued. There's a reason you look out the window and seek nature, it can help you concentrate on your work and to maintain performance across the workday.

Certainly this study has implications for workplace well-being and adds extra impetus to continue greening our cities. City planners around the world are switching on to these benefits of green roofs and we hope the future of our cities will be a very green one.

She and her team next plan to see if city greening makes people more helpful and creative, as well as productive.

Previously: Nature is good for you, right? and Out of office auto-reply: Reaping the benefits of nature
Photo by Jeremy Reding

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