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MeDesign Human Health Book: human anatomy diagrams with sleek new look


For many people, the topic of human anatomy evokes feelings of both marvel and dismay. The workings of the body may be a wonder to behold, but their intricacies can be a pain to sort out, remember and explain.

To make human anatomy easier to learn and understand, Bruce Ian Meader, an associate professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology’s Vignelli Center for Design Studies, and his class of 13 first-year graduate students tackled the task of streamlining diagrams of human anatomy in 2014 as part of the School's Medicine+Design initiative.

For this assignment, the class was given 10 weeks to design several short book chapters that explain systems of the human body for a general audience. To accomplish the task, the class split into small groups to research, write, and design simplified layouts of body systems, such as the brain, eyes, joints and nervous system. Once the book chapters were complete, the students worked together to assemble the chapters into a book they called the MeDesign Human Health Book.

The book is already earning praise and has sparked a second phase for the Medicine+Design initiative in 2015. You can view the entire book online for free at the school's website.

Previously: University of Glasgow medical student makes learning anatomy a feast for the sensesImage of the Week: A playful take on the human respiratory systemImage of the Week: VeggieanatomyImage of the Week: Quilled anatomyKitchen anatomy: Brain carved from a watermelon
Via Street Anatomy
Artwork courtesy of Bruce Ian Meader and artist Cai Jai

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