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Grand Roundup: Top posts of May

The five most-read stories this month on Scope were:

Eating for good blood: Tips for boosting iron levels and hemoglobin: This entry from the Stanford Blood Center discusses hemoglobin levels and offers ways to boost levels prior to blood donation.

Cracking medical school admissions: Stanford students use their expertise to help others: In this Q&A, fourth-year medical students Rachel Rizal and Rishi Mediratta share insights on the medical school admissions process and talk about a book they've written on the topic.

“Still many unknowns”: Stanford physician reflects on post-earthquake NepalPaul Auerbach, MD, a professor and chief of emergency medicine who works with the Stanford Emergency Medicine Program for Emergency Response (SEMPER), recently traveled to Nepal to aid victims of the April 25 earthquake.

Stanford Storytellers: Medical students write a children’s book to comfort and educate: A group of Stanford medical students - and an undergrad - have penned a book geared towards young hospital patients.

Talking about “mouseheimers,” and a call for new neuroscience technologies: This post, based on a session from the recent Association of Health Care Journalists conference, features the work of Stanford neuropsychiatrist Amit Etkin, MD, PhD, and neurologist Michael Greicius, MD, MPH.

Our most-shared story of the month: Stanford Storytellers: Medical students write a children’s book to comfort and educate

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle provided a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Popular posts

Category:
Genetics
Sex biology redefined: Genes don’t indicate binary sexes

The scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex.