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Keeping an even keel: Stanford surgery residents learn to balance work and life

med students in sailboat

Residency is one of the most intense times in a surgeon’s training, and it can take a toll physically and mentally on newly minted medical school graduates as they learn to cope.

To help them counter that stress, Stanford’s Department of Surgery started the Balance in Life Program for its residents. The program, and one of its team-building exercises - a sailing lesson in one of the world’s best sailing spots, the San Francisco Bay - were highlighted in a recent Inside Stanford Medicine story.

As described in the piece, the program is dedicated to the memory of Greg Feldman, MD, a former chief surgical resident at Stanford who committed suicide in 2010. The program provides basics like easy-to-access healthy meals, group therapy sessions and social activities, and Ralph Greco, MD, the program’s director said of it:

A lot of people would argue with the notion that such a program is necessary... I know our day of sailing may raise some eyebrows, but our faculty decided that we should do whatever we could to give these young people the tools they need to help them deal with the vicissitudes of life and medicine through the rest of their careers.

The article also notes that the program attracts residents interested in work-life balance to Stanford:

“The fact that we have this Balance in Life Program is great for recruitment of like-minded individuals,” [resident Micaela Esquivel, MD,] said. “I can tell medical students considering us that they would be hard-pressed to find another program that cares enough about their well-being to offer what we do.”

Previously: A call to action to improve balance and reduce stress in the lives of resident physicians, Surgeon offers his perspective on balancing life and work, Program for residents reflects “massive change” in surgeon mentality and New surgeons take time out for mental health
Photo by Norbert von der Groeben

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