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When dementia hits home: The global impact of dementia on women

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A report released last week by Alzheimer’s Disease International calls attention to the disproportionate effects of dementia on women worldwide.

As noted in the report, women are more at risk for dementia than men for two primary reasons: age and genetics. Women's longer lifespans leave them more vulnerable to the age-related condition. In addition, there are biological factors that make women more likely to suffer from dementia.

Women are also more likely to be the caregivers to those with the disease. Women care not only for family members — they're often also employed in low-paid caregiving professions. This is particularly true in lower income countries, where as many as 62 percent of people with dementia live, according to the report.

The burden of dementia strains family structures and community dynamics in these disadvantaged nations. In the report, Faraneh Farin, who is involved with the Iran Alzheimer Association, describes the situation in countries like Iran:

Nowadays, more women are working to support their families but should they need to care for a family member, then it is expected that they quit their jobs resulting in their marginalization. It seems that either way, whether a woman has dementia or she cares for a loved one, she is trapped in the cycle which has been constructed by the society. Dementia is an issue that engages a woman’s entire life.

The global costs of dementia amount to more than $600 billion, yet many sufferers, caregivers and programs lack adequate funds. The report calls for additional resources for female dementia victims and caregivers, and it highlights the need for additional research on dementia's effects, especially in countries with lower incomes. These countries also need to develop national strategies that consider the needs of women, the report states.

Alzheimer’s Disease International aims to elevate the awareness of dementia's impact on women globally and to spur national efforts to improve care. As Executive Director Mark Wortmann wrote in the Foreward: "I hope the report will find its way onto the desks of policy makers to help improve the quality of life for women living with dementia, as well as the millions of women all around the world who provide care and support for them."

Alex Giacomini is an English literature major at UC Berkeley and a writing and social media intern in the medical school’s Office of Communication and Public Affairs.  

Previously: Study suggests yoga may help caregivers of dementia patients manage stressStanford neuroscientist discusses the coming dementia epidemic, and Science Friday explores women’s heightened risk for Alzheimer’s
Photo by Valerie Everett

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