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Grand Roundup: Top posts of June

It's time to look back at this month's five-most read stories on Scope. They were:

Eating for good blood: Tips for boosting iron levels and hemoglobin: This entry from the Stanford Blood Center discusses hemoglobin levels and offers ways to boost levels prior to blood donation.

New recommendation: Adults need at least 7 hours of sleep each night: How much sleep is needed for adults? A new set of recommendations was published in the journal SLEEP and developed by 15 sleep experts in a consensus panel assembled by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society.

CRISPR marches forward: Stanford scientists optimize use in human blood cells: CRISPR is a breakthrough way of editing the genome of many organisms, including humans — a kind of biological cut-and-paste function that is already transforming scientific and clinical research. New work in this area is detailed here.

To live longer, men need to embrace their femininity, new research suggests: Women live longer than men, but when faced with socio-economic adversity, that lifespan gap grows, according to new research from a team of Stanford scientists.

Stanford med student/HHMI fellow investigates bacteriophage therapy as an alternative to antibiotics: In this piece, second-year medical student Eric Trac discusses the work he's doing for his year-long Howard Hughes Medical Institute fellowship.

Our most-shared story of the month: New recommendation: Adults need at least 7 hours of sleep each night

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Popular posts

Category:
Genetics
Sex biology redefined: Genes don’t indicate binary sexes

The scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex.