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Parents turn to data after son is diagnosed with ultra-rare disease

Keynote talks and presentations from the 2015 Big Data in Biomedicine conference at Stanford are now available on the Stanford YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to improve the practice of medicine and enhance human health, we're featuring a selection of the videos on Scope.

Four years ago, Matthew Might, PhD, and his wife, Christina, learned that their son Bertrand was the first person to be diagnosed with ultra-rare genetic disorder called N-Glycanase Disorder. At the 2015 Big Data in Biomedicine conference at Stanford, Might recounted the story of his son's medical odyssey and explained how a team of Duke University researchers used whole-exome sequencing, which is a protein-focused variant of whole-genome sequencing, on himself, his wife and Bertrand to arrive at his son's diagnosis.

Watch the video above to find out how Might and his family, who turned a deaf ear to doctors' advice that nothing could be done for their son, harnessed the power of the Internet to identify 35 more patients with the same disorder and are now leading the charge in helping scientists better understand the disorder.

Previously: Nobel Laureate Michael Levitt explains why "biology is information rich" at Big Data in Biomedicine, At Big Data in Biomedicine, Stanford’s Lloyd Minor focuses on precision health, Experts at Big Data in Biomedicine: Bigger, better datasets and technology will benefit patients, On the move: Big Data in Biomedicine goes mobile with discussion on mHealth and Big Data in Biomedicine panelists: Genomics’ future is bright

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