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It’s never too early to protect your skin from sun damage

I’m not ashamed to admit that I dork out for Disneyland. I was there a few weeks ago, wearing a Minnie Mouse T-shirt and sprinting from one thrill ride to the next. But this trip was different in one respect: I made sure to apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen to my face and limbs before heading into the Magic Kingdom and then brought along the tube so that I could reapply it throughout the day.

Growing up, I was happy that my skin picked up a tan easily, with only occasional sunburn. As an adult, I watched the evidence pile up about the hazards of sun exposure and tried to remember to use sunscreen in the summer months when I was outside for long periods of time. But after speaking with several Stanford dermatologists for a story about skin protection for the recent issue of Stanford Medicine magazine, I resolved to be more vigilant year-round.

As my story notes, one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. One good way of warding off that threat is to use a broad-spectrum sunscreen, many of which are now much lighter and less greasy that the sunscreens of old.

“Your sunscreen should be considered your facial lotion,” dermatology professor Susan Swetter, MD, told me. “It works to moisturize the skin as well as to prevent photoaging and skin cancer.”

The story also includes tips for protecting your skin and for encouraging children to develop good skin-protection habits at an early age. Parents seem to be taking the message to heart: As I made my way through the crowded streets of Disneyland, one scent stood out among all of the others. The unmistakable smell of sunscreen.

Previously: This summer’s Stanford Medicine magazine shows some skinBeat the heat – and protect your skin from the sunWorking to protect athletes from sun dangers and The importance of sunscreen in preventing skin cancer
Illustration by Aleksandar Velasevic

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