Skip to content

How the FDA is promoting data sharing and transparency to support innovations in public health

Keynote talks and presentations from the 2015 Big Data in Biomedicine conference at Stanford are now available on the Stanford YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to improve the practice of medicine and enhance human health, we’re featuring a selection of the videos on Scope.

At the 2014 Big Data in Biomedicine conference, Taha Kass-Hout, MD, chief health informatics officer for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, announced that the federal agency was launching OpenFDA, a scalable search and big-data analytics platform. In May, he returned to the Big Data in Biomedicine stage to offer an update on the initiative and discuss how the FDA is continuing to foster access and transparency of big data in government.

During his talk, Kass-Hout shared some eye-popping statistics about the information available through OpenFDA. The platform houses close to 70,000 product labels for pharmaceuticals; nearly four million reports on adverse events or malfunctions of medical devices; 41,000 records on recalls of foods, pharmaceuticals or devices and over four and a half million reports of adverse events or side-effects of drugs.

He outlined future plans to build a similar public, cloud-based platform to compliment the Obama Administration's Precision Medicine Initiative. Watch the full talk to learn more about these exciting efforts to unlock the rapidly growing reservoir of biomedical data and spur innovation in public health.

Previously: A look at the MyHeart Counts app and the potential of mobile technologies to improve human health, Discussing patient participation in medical research: “We had to take this into our own hands," A look at aging and longevity in this “unprecedented” time in history, Mining Twitter to identify cases of foodborne illness and Discussing access and transparency of big data in government

Popular posts