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Grand Roundup: Top posts of July

It’s time to look back at this month’s five-most read stories on Scope. They were:

Eating for good blood: Tips for boosting iron levels and hemoglobin: This entry from the Stanford Blood Center discusses hemoglobin levels and offers ways to boost levels prior to blood donation.

Genetic study supports single migratory origin for aboriginal Americans: An international team of geneticists, evolutionary biologists, and statisticians have concluded that all Native Americans descended from a single immigration event out of Siberia.

“This is probably one of the last major diseases we know nothing about”: A look at CFS: A recent issue of Palo Alto Weekly focused on chronic fatigue syndrome (also known as systemic exertion intolerance disease) and the work of Ronald Davis, PhD, director of Stanford’s Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Research Center and others here.

The worst disease you’ve never heard of: Stanford researchers and patients battle EB: An article in Stanford Medicine magazine describes the toll of a devastating skin disease called epidermoloysis bullosa on two young men and their families, as well as the determined efforts of a dedicated team of doctors and scientists to find a treatment.

Physician-monk leads Stanford doctors in meditation: This post highlighted a recent campus talk by Barry Kerzin, MD, a Buddhist monk who provides medical care to His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Popular posts

Category:
Genetics
Sex biology redefined: Genes don’t indicate binary sexes

The scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex.