Skip to content

Girls’ Day Out event helps unite — and nurture — teens battling cancer

Untitled designThere are many treatments, therapies and drugs for cancer, but sometimes a day of pampering with friends is just what the doctor ordered.

That's why nine teenage girls being treated for cancer at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford  were lavished with a bit of tender loving care — and some quality bonding time — at the seventh annual Girls' Day Out.

The festivities began at 8:30 on Wednesday night with a limo ride from the hospital to TOVA Day Spa in the Fairmont Hotel in downtown San Jose. At TOVA, teens that had attended Girls’ Day Out events from years before had the opportunity to reconnect, chat and welcome newcomers as they received massages, pedicures, manicures, hairstyling and a gourmet lunch. This story in the San Jose Mercury News explains:

"It's really fun and a great getaway; it's really nice to be with people who won't keep asking 'what happened to your arm,' " said incoming Saratoga High School freshman Simran Mallik, 14. She was left with a scar on her arm after undergoing treatment for Ewing Sarcoma, a type of bone cancer. "I feel like I connect with them more; it's just easier to communicate."

Tova Yaron, the owner of TOVA Day Spa, has sponsored this event for the past seven years with support from the Children Having Exceptional Educational and Recreational Support (CHEERS) program that's a part of the 19 for Life Foundation. At the event, Yaron and her staff donate their time and expertise to create a day of fun, and free spa treatments, for the girls.

TOVA's spa treatments are a refreshing break from the kind of treatments and therapies the teens are used to receiving as cancer patients, but perhaps the most important gift the girls receive is the opportunity to relax and be themselves among friends who understand what it's like to be a teenager battling cancer.

"It’s interesting to see how other people are after they've gone through (cancer treatment)," said Vivian Lou 15, a student at James Logan High School in Union City who was diagnosed with Wilms Tumor, a type of kidney cancer, five years ago. "It's nice because I don't have to feel weird about it because they've also been through it."

"I wish I could do more," said Yaron. "I am honored, they are lovely girls, they have amazing attitudes, they are brave beyond belief, they are amazing. They are inspiring us with their bravery."

Previously: Not just for kids: A discussion of play and why we all need to do itHow social connection can improve physical and mental health and The scientific importance of social connections for your health
Photo by Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford

Popular posts

Category:
Genetics
Sex biology redefined: Genes don’t indicate binary sexes

The scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex.
Category:
Nutrition
Intermittent fasting: Fad or science-based diet?

Are the health-benefit claims from intermittent fasting backed up by scientific evidence? John Trepanowski, postdoctoral research fellow at the Stanford Prevention Research Center,weighs in.