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“24/7 Sobriety” program may offer a simple fix for drunken driving

8684229367_2826035583_zEvery now and then I read a story that takes what I think I know about a certain topic and turns it upside down. Today, my understanding of programs to reduce drunk driving were upended by an article written by Keith Humphreys, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at Stanford.

As Humphreys explains, many people mistakenly believe that no one can overcome a drinking problem without treatment involving a professional's help. This, he says, is a myth, and the success of the "24/7 Sobriety" program highlights the importance of exploring and adopting new ways to combat drunken driving. From the Wall Street Journal article:

Offenders in 24/7 Sobriety can drive all they want to, but they are under a court order not to drink. Every morning and evening, for an average of five months, they visit a police facility to take a breathalyzer test. Unlike most consequences imposed by the criminal justice system, the penalties for noncompliance are swift, certain and modest. Drinking results in mandatory arrest, with a night or two in jail as the typical penalty.

The results have been stunning. Since 2005, the program has administered more than 7 million breathalyzer tests to over 30,000 participants. Offenders have both showed up and passed the test at a rate of over 99%.

Counties that used the 24/7 Sobriety program also had a 12% decrease in repeat drunken-driving arrests and a 9% drop in domestic-violence arrests, according to a 2013 study.

A possible reason why this program works — when attempts to help people with drinking problems often fail — is that the twice daily breathalyzer tests have immediate consequences, Humphreys explains. "It turns out that people with drug and alcohol problems are just like the rest of us. Their behavior is affected much more by what is definitely going to happen today than by what might or might not happen far in the future, even if the potential future consequences are more serious."

Previously: Can the "24/7 sobriety" model reduce drunken disorderly conduct and violence in London?Alcoholism: Not just a man’s problem and Stopping criminal men from drinking reduces domestic violence
Photo by: KOMUnews

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