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Meet the stars of Stanford Medicine

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I’ve been at Stanford long enough - 14 years and counting! - to have met countless amazingly dedicated, hard-working people. And it’s not just the seasoned faculty and rising young doctors who impress me; I’ve seen firsthand the importance of the contributions of people like grad students, research assistants, department admins, and even (ahem) communication professionals. They’re all vital to Stanford Medicine’s mission.

This week, we’re launching a new series to introduce our followers – both near and far – to some of the “stars” that keep our universe in motion. Over on Instagram and Facebook you’ll hear why these people chose their field (“I think that relentless optimism drew me here,” says a first-year med student), what they like most about Stanford (“If there’s something you have no idea about you just walk down the corridor and you’ll find the answer,” marvels a postdoc in structural biology), and how they’ve come to view their work (“I think I didn’t realize how rewarding it would be; I didn’t realize how hard it would be,” reflects a pediatrician who develops community programs for families living in poverty). I hope you’ll follow #StarsofStanfordMed and feel as inspired by these folks as I do.

Previously: Stanford Medicine is on Instagram
Photos by Angela Gargano

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