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NBC Dateline to explore the “extraordinary situation” facing one Packard Children’s transplant family

Bingham family - 560

It’s a story that seems a bit hard to believe.

Stacy and Jason Bingham of Haines, Oregon, have five beautiful children — Sierra, Megan, Lindsey, Hunter, and Gage. Unfortunately, as written about on Scope previously, three of the kids have been hit with cardiomyopathy, a life-threatening disease of the heart muscle that reduces the heart's ability to pump blood effectively. Two other children are being monitored for heart irregularities.

The result? The eldest, 16-year-old Sierra, has received two heart transplants at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, one in 2006 and a replacement in 2015. Lindsey, 12, had a heart transplant in 2013. Gage, 7, was recently placed on a Heartware ventricular assist device in order to support his failing heart. He is now awaiting placement on the transplant list. Meanwhile, cardiologists are keeping an eye on any potential problems that could be faced by Megan, 14, and Hunter, 9.

“This is an incredibly strong and wonderful family, and they’re facing an extraordinary situation,” said David Rosenthal, MD, director of the pediatric heart failure program at Packard Children’s.

This Sunday, January 17, at 9 PM Pacific, Dateline NBC will be presenting their second national broadcast looking at the personal and medical journey the Binghams have faced, along with the many challenges ahead. In addition, the program will reveal some of the advanced therapies for heart failure offered by the Heart Center at Stanford Children’s Health.

The first Dateline NBC program on the Bingham family, which aired in 2013, can be viewed here.

Robert Dicks is senior director of media relations for Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford.

Previously: Ventricular assist device helps teen graduate from high schoolStem cell medicine for hearts? Yes, please, says one amazing family and Packard Children’s heart transplant family featured tonight on Dateline
Photo by Norbert von der Groeben

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