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Stanford neurologist Sharon Sha

Stanford neurologist ponders her interest in the human brain

"Why are you so interested in the human brain?" My Alzheimers, a blog dedicated to raising awareness and money for an Alzheimer’s cure, recently spoke with Stanford's Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS, and posed that question. "For as long as I can remember I’ve been interested in the brain," she says in the video below. “I think the brain is what distinguishes us from other animals… what makes us humans, essentially."

As part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders, Sha is dedicated to studying ways to fight memory disorders and cognitive decline. "I think it's fascinating to help people understand why" the brain isn't functioning in the right way, she shares.

Alex Giacomini is a social media intern in the medical school’s Office of Communication and Public Affairs. 

Previously: Stanford ingenuity + big data = new insight into the ADHD brainAn 18-month portrait of a brain yields new insights into connectivity — and coffeeStanford neurobiologist Bill Newsome: Seeking gains for the brain and Brain videos, from the brains of neuroscientists
Photo by Paul Sakuma

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