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Countdown to Childx: Discussing worldwide progress on children’s survival


Indian girl and boyZulfiqa Bhutta, MD, from the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, is an internationally recognized expert on children's health. He'll be a featured speaker at Stanford's Childx conference, being held on April 21 and 22, and I spoke to him in advance of the conference about children's health issues.

Bhutta is clearly an optimist and cites bright spots all around the globe, telling me he never imagined there would be such tremendous success on children's survival rates in just 15 to 20 years. "By one measure - children's survivability - the world is much better off," he said. "It's a consequence of the world setting goals and achieving them." Bhutta believes a lot more can be accomplished in the future, but he's also a realist who recognizes that when nations and regions are torn apart by conflict, terrorism and economic instability, women and children are often the casualties. You'll learn more in this 1:2:1 podcast.

Previously: Registration opens for Stanford’s Childx conferenceEnding preventable stillbirth: A Q&A with Stanford global-health expert Gary DarmstadtAn optimist’s approach to improving global child healthPediatric health expert Alan Guttmacher outlines key issues facing children’s health today and Countdown to Childx: Global health expert Gary Darmstadt on improving newborn survival
Photo from United Nations Photos

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